Arrested Development Family Reunion

October 3, 2011

If you “like” the New Yorker Facebook page, then hit the “Facebook Exclusives” link on the left side of that page, you can watch a 97-minute panel with the entire cast and the creator of Arrested Development. Lots of great tidbits about the show and fun news about the prospect of a movie. I was planning to listen to 10 minutes of this. That was 97 minutes ago.

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Look Around You: Music in the Year 2000

November 10, 2010

The fact that I listened to this four times and laughed really loudly all alone in my apartment might be proof that I’ve taken three too many dodgeballs to the head.


TV Scientist compares 30-Rock to Shit My Dad Says

November 8, 2010

Eric Voss, annoyed that SMDS has better ratings than 30-Rock, has counted and catalogued the numbers and types of jokes in episodes of each. The results: 30-Rock has more complex story lines, more types of jokes, and relies on insults for far fewer laughs. On the other hand, one 21-minute episode of SMDS used a laugh track for a total of 4 minutes. Analysis here.


Live TV, guys.

November 2, 2010

UPDATE: This was a post about a live news broadcast rife with errors, which has since been erased from the historical record that is YouTube. I will therefore attempt to describe the awesomeness from memory:

SERIOUS ACTION NEWS MUSIC PLAYS.
OPEN ON A SHOT OF AN UNPREPARED ANCHOR.
SHE IS LOOKING OVER HER NOTES.
NOTICES SHE’S ON TV AND LOOKS UTTERLY PANICKED.

SABRINA:
O HAI. UM.

THE CAMERA SLOWLY DRIFTS OVER TO THE NEWSDESK,
WHERE A PAIR OF SMUG ANCHORS TRY NOT TO LAUGH.

THE FOLLOWING DIALOGUE INCLUDES BOTH THE ANCHORS’ SPEECH, AND THEIR SUBTEXT.

STEVE:
A HAHA DON’T WORRY ABOUT SABRINA THERE. I’M STEVE AND I GOT THIS. TODAY IS…. WELL LISA WILL TELL YOU THE DATE WON’T YOU LISA.

LISA:
YES STEEEVE, IT’S SEPTEMBER THE TWELFTH AS YOU CAN CLEARLY SEE RIGHT HERE ON THE SCRIPT.

STEVE:
WELL LISA I DIDN’T SEE IT BECAUSE YOU HAD YOUR BIG ELBOW ON IT.

LISA:
O AHAHA STEVE WHAT A COMEDIAN. VIEWERS, NOW WE’RE GOING TO COVER A STORY AND STEVE WILL TELL YOU WHICH STORY. RIGHT STEEEVE?!!!

STEVE:
LISA I HATE YOU MORE THAN MY EX WIFE.

LISA:
STEVE I AM YOUR EX WIFE. NOW OVER TO SOMEWHERE, WITH UMM… JACKIE… SOMETHING.

CAMERA SLOWLY DRIFTS OVER TO A WALL ON THE STUDIO, AND LINGERS THERE.

CUT TO:
AN ANCHOR WHOSE NAME IS NOT JACKIE, STANDING BESIDE A ROAD.
SHE HAS NO IDEA SHE’S ON-AIR.
SHE STARES BLANKLY INTO THE CAMERA, WAITING FOR HER CUE.

AFTER A PAUSE LONG ENOUGH TO EVOLVE A NEW SPECIES,
JACKIE SOMETHING STARTS SPEAKING VERY PROFESSIONALLY ABOUT, UM, SOMETHING.

THE CAMERA CASUALLY DRIFTS PAST HER.
TRYING TO SEEM PROFESSIONAL, SHE EDGES BACK INTO SHOT.

THE CAMERA KEEPS DRIFTING.
SHE KEEPS EDGING ALONG WITH IT.

THEN HER PATH IS BLOCKED BY A SMALL FENCE.
SHE CAN’T GET INTO THE SHOT ANY MORE.

THE CAMERA KEEPS DRIFTING OVER, EVENTUALLY FOCUSSING ON A PERSON RIDING A SCOOTER DOWN THE SIDEWALK.

JACKIE SOMETHING KEEPS TALKING ABOUT SOMETHING,
DESPITE HAVING BEEN COMPLETELY FRAMED OUT OF THE SHOT.

Aw man. The camera was the hilarious fourth character in this small drama; it was acting like an unruly guide dog. You know those unfocused ones who are always trying to smell the trashcan, and the owner stands there hissing DUSTY FORWARD, FORWARD DUSTY but the dog ignores them and just keeps nudging its face into a discarded Cinnabon. This camera reeeally wants a shot of that person in the scooter, forget “Jackie” and her “something”.

A-for effort, news team. The juxtaposition between the SERIOUS ACTION NEWS MUSIC and the drifty camera was the best.


Craigslist TV

October 8, 2010

Craigslist TV is a brilliantly simple idea: pick interesting Craigslist listings and document the responses.

Here’s one where a woman has an accordian to give away, and chooses three respondents to come play at her dinner party. Her guests’ favourite accordianist will win the free squeezebox. The footage is a bit jumpy, but it’s quite nicely put together nonetheless; surprisingly fun to watch.

Via Kottke.


Poochinski

June 2, 2010

Apparently this was a real TV pilot? That was rejected because ABC didn’t know from absolute comedic gold? Didn’t they learn anything from Alf? Gruff puppet characters, man. That’s where it was AT.

Via MeFi.


What TV directors do

April 20, 2010

For the ER pilot in 1994, Holcomb devised the show’s trademark verite style. Action scenes were designed to convey a feeling of organized chaos—the camera was constantly moving, and the actors had to work to stay in its view. It was an idea he drew from visits to real emergency rooms, where long stretches of boredom were punctuated by sudden bursts of manic activity.

Interesting article at Slate.
Via Kottke.